Plants

Borojó: everything you need to know

 

The borojó, botanically classified as Alibertia patinoi, is a tropical fruit that grows on a small tree of the same name, evergreen that reaches up to four meters in height belonging to the Rubiaceae family. Its production is throughout the year.

The borojó is a small fruit, with an average of 7 to 12 centimeters in diameter, and has a round to oval shape. When immature, the fruits are firm, green and inedible and, as they ripen, they acquire a soft consistency and a dark brown hue.

The pulp of this fruit is brown, dense and creamy, inside it has many small oval seeds. It contains a high moisture content and adequate levels of sugar and acidity, giving them a complex and bittersweet taste reminiscent of tamarind.

Today, borójó is widely used for medicinal, culinary, and cosmetic purposes. This fruit is also considered a superfruit for its nutritional content and is frequently consumed as a revitalizing beverage.

Borom is an excellent source of vitamins B, C and niacin, so it keeps the digestive system and nervous system functioning properly. It is also rich in phosphorus, iron and calcium to strengthen bones and teeth. Its fiber content stimulates the digestive tract.

Index

How to grow borojó

Optimal cultivation requires high humidity, about 85% and an average temperature of at least 25°C, although the tree can tolerate brief frosts and floods. It has grayish-brown bark and sometimes has two or three smaller trunks, as well as a main one. The plant is sensitive to winds.

It generally grows in the shade of other trees and adapts well up to 1,200 m altitude. New trees can be grown from seeds, cuttings, aerial layering or grafting. The tree enjoys moderate light and requires good watering, you can not let the earth dry. You can fertilize monthly with a balanced fertilizer.

Generally, half of the plants produced by seeds are male and therefore do not bear fruit, it is essential to graft with female shoots. This is possible at the first flowering, once the sex of the plants has been identified. To ensure natural pollination between boron trees, you must have 10% of male species well distributed within the plantation.

Pests and diseases

This plant resists very well the attack of pests and diseases. However, some cases of ant attack have been observed, specifically the muleteer (Atha Cephalotes) which can cause premature fall of the leaves. In other cases, damage has been seen caused by larvae belonging to a micro lepidoptera.

As for diseases, this bush can be deficient in iron and boron. These physiological problems can be seen in calcareous soils and are manifested with the appearance of black spots on the skin of the fruit. This can be improved by altering the pH of the soil and adding the necessary nutrients.

 

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Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

Robert Asprin

Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

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