Plants

Fruit trees with thorns

 

Surely you have ever been surprised by a puncture when touching a tree, you may have wondered exactly why there are some species of fruit trees with thorns. These bumps coming out on branches and leaves serve as an armament.

There are many trees with thorns, some are barely noticeable. These spines represent a defense mechanism against animals that can damage or destroy the tree. Young fruiting plants, in particular, develop thorns to preserve the harvest.

While it is true that the thorns have been extracted from species grown in orchards, wild fruit trees still preserve them. This in order to protect themselves from the ravages of hungry and hostile fauna present in nature.

Over the years, botanists have propagated fruit trees to discourage the growth of thorns. After all, fruit trees developed specifically for the harvest of their fruit do not need thorns, since the horticulturists who grow them have a vested interest in perpetuating, rather than devastating, the tree.

Most gardeners can prune thorns safely, without fear of damaging the tree, or putting reproduction or survival at risk. Some of the most common fruit trees with thorns are citrus fruits, although we can also find other varieties.

Index

3 fruit trees with thorns

In nature you can find plant species with thorns and without thorns. Many of them provide you with rich fruits, others can serve as decorations. Those 3 fruit trees with the most common thorns are: lemon, orange and wild apple tree.

Lemon tree: Some of the most common fruit trees with thorns include lemon trees, even varieties bred specifically for container cultivation have thorns. Thorns on these trees may or may not be noticeable, so be careful when working with one of them.

The spines of a lemon tree are usually very prolific and can measure up to 15 cm in larger trees. Thorns are common on younger shoots, where vegetation has a higher risk of being chewed by a herbivore.

Orange tree: Orange trees have thin, blunt-tipped and slightly flexible spines. Botanically, the spines are short, pointed branches. Because they are technically branches, the spines are connected to the tree’s vascular system.

The cultivation and popularity of oranges have already given rise to varieties without thorns or some with smaller spines, which are usually found at the base of the leaves. But there are still many types of oranges that have thorns that are larger, which produces a bitter taste.

Wild apple tree: Modern apple trees that have been planted in orchards have no thorns. To see fruit apple trees with spikes, it is necessary to look in nature. Older apple trees growing in forests or other protected areas are likely to have thorns.

The wild or crab apple tree is one of the thorniest species, its fruits are small and its flavor is a little more acidic. The spines of this variety are well camouflaged, so be very careful when you want to enjoy them.

 

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Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

Robert Asprin

Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

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