Plants

How to graft an orange tree?

 

Grafting an orange tree is a great way to grow different types of oranges from the same root. In fact, one of the biggest advantages of grafting is that you can graft on all citrus trees. Probably the most complicated part of the whole process of grafting an orange tree is the long time that must be waited for nature to do its job and allow the cultivation successfully.

Index

Steps to graft an orange tree

To graft an orange tree you must wait for it to be the right season, which happens in spring. It is at this time when you should start with the orange tree grafting process. The best time to cut and insert the grafts is when the tree is on the cusp of the entrance of the active growing season.

Most grafts made between the months of April and September usually grow quite well and therefore will produce a lot of fruits in the coming years.

Be sure to cut a good number of grafting branches that are 10 to 12 inches long, about 25 to 30 cm approximately, from a healthy tree.

These branches have to be representative of the growth of the previous year, so you should avoid using grafts from the current year’s tree, as this usually does not generate good quality or successful grafts. It is preferable that you use a knife with a good edge for this part of the process since otherwise you run the risk of chipping the base of the graft.

Then choose the orange tree in which you want to place the graft, but keep in mind that for the best results, it is always recommended that you place the grafts at least 25 cm away from the ground, but not higher. This is because the closer to the soil the graft is, the greater the amount of nutrients, water and wisdom they can receive. If you place it very high, it is more likely to dry out or take longer to become a strong branch.

Now make a cut of approximately 3.75 cm in a “T” shape at the site you have chosen for grafting. Use the knife with edge and do not forget that the cut must be made below the bark, inside the orange tree you have chosen. Then take the first branch to make the orange graft and then choose the largest shoot to then cut slightly and make a small cut of wood at the same time in the bark, on which it must be grafted.

After this he discovers the wood under the “T” cut by lifting the bark a little. Then graft the wood on which the shoot is tied and begins in the upper area of the “T” going down. The shoot has to be held in place by the bark of the tree.

After this, roll some tape under and above the graft with the intention of preventing it from moving and interrupting the process of integration with the orange tree.

 

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Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

Robert Asprin

Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

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