Plants

Trampas para insectos

Entomological traps are used to monitor or directly reduce populations of insects or other arthropods. They usually use nutrients, visual attractants, chemicals or pheromones and are arranged in places that do not injure other animals or make residues in food.

The mechanism of the trap or bait are variable, for example flies and wasps are attracted to proteins. Mosquitoes and many other insects are attracted by bright colors, carbon dioxide, lactic acid, floral or fruity fragrances, heat, moisture and pheromones. Synthetic attractants such as methyl eugenol are very effective with tephrytid diptera.

Let’s see below, how to take care of fruit trees from insects, using devices to catch them and eliminate them from our garden.

 

Type of insect traps

Light traps

These devices, with or without ultraviolet light attract certain insects. Its design is variable according to the behavior of the insects to be studied. Grasshoppers and some beetles are attracted to light of large wavelengths but are repelled by shortwave light.

Chromotropic traps

Chromotropic traps attract insects by color. Many insects are attracted by luminous radiation of a certain wavelength, usually green, yellow or white. Many of the aphids are attracted to green, white attracts tentredinids, yellow attracts many of the order Diptera, hymenoptera, and Rhynchota.

These devices have a very small radius of action. It is important where they are put, for example in the monitoring of the Tephrytid diptera should be put on the outside of the cup in the southern part and at the height of a man.

Adhesive traps

They often carry a bait as well.

Traps for flying insects

Flight interception plants are either structures or transparent or in the form of a network.

Traps for terrestrial arthropods

Pitfall traps are used for carabids and arachnids.

Funnel-like devices are used to capture insect pupae underground.

Devices for aquatic arthropods

They typically have the shape of funnels

 

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Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

Robert Asprin

Robert Asprin, APD is a non-dieting Accredited Practicing Dietitian passionate about inspiring positive changes in eating and lifestyle behaviors to help improve health while nurturing relationships with food and body.

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